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Research Projects

When a live site is down or time is of the essence, software teams mobilize to fix bugs as fast as possible. How might such important bugs be fixed more quickly? One answer is through crowdsourcing, where ad-hoc participants are each given small, self-contained microtasks that are then aggregated into an overall solution. To explore this idea, we are currently designing new techniques and tools for crowd debugging.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
January 2013

To enable much of our research to enable program understanding, software quality, and maintenance, we utilize and develop analyses of program code. These analyses model the flows of information through the logic of programs and systems. With these analysis models enable automated techniques to assist development and maintenance tasks.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
March 1998

In the era of big data and personalization, websites and (mobile) applications collect an increasingly large amount of personal information about their users. The large majority of users decide to disclose some but not all information that is requested from them. They trade off the anticipated benefits with the privacy risks of disclosure, a decision process that has been dubbed privacy calculus. Such decisions are inherently difficult though, because they may have uncertain repercussions later on that are difficult to weigh against the (possibly immediate) gratification of disclosure. How can we help users to balance the benefits and risks of information disclosure in a user-friendly manner, so that they can make good privacy decisions?

Project Dates: 
September 2010

Anti-social behavior such as flaming and griefing is pervasive and problematic in many online venues. This behavior breaks established norms and unsettles the well-being and development of online communities. In a popular online game, Riot Games's League of Legends, the game company received tens of thousands of complaints about others every day. To regulate what they call "toxic" behavior, Riot devised the "Tribunal" system as a way of letting the community to police itself. The Tribunal is a crowdsoucing system that empowers players to identify and judge misbehavior.

Project Dates: 
April 2012

This research addresses challenges in understanding and developing lightweight, Web-based informal music education environments that bring the complexity and joy of orchestral music to diverse audiences. The challenges span from providing awareness and appreciation of different classical music genres through creation of multi-instrument musical compositions, in ways that are fun and interactive.

Project Dates: 
January 2011

ArchStudio is an open-source software and systems architecture development environment developed by the Institute for Software Research at the University of California, Irvine. It is an environment of integrated tools for modeling, visualizing, analyzing and implementing software and systems architectures. It is based on the Eclipse open development platform.

Project Dates: 
January 2001

Sourcerer is an ongoing research project at the University of California, Irvine aimed at exploring open source projects through the use of code analysis. The existence of an extremely large body of open source code presents a tremendous opportunity for software engineering research. Not only do we leverage this code for our own research, but we provide the open source Sourcerer Infrastructure and curated datasets for other researchers to use.

The Sourcerer Infrastructure is composed of a number of layers.

Project Dates: 
January 2006

Computer games may well be the quintessential domain for software engineering R&D. Why? Modern multi-player online games (MMOG) must address core issues in just about every major area of Computer Science and SE research and education.

Project Dates: 
January 2010

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