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Research Projects

When a live site is down or time is of the essence, software teams mobilize to fix bugs as fast as possible. How might such important bugs be fixed more quickly? One answer is through crowdsourcing, where ad-hoc participants are each given small, self-contained microtasks that are then aggregated into an overall solution. To explore this idea, we are currently designing new techniques and tools for crowd debugging.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
January 2013

Yelp reviews and ratings are important source of information to make informed decisions about a venue. We conjecture that further classification of yelp reviews into relevant categories can help users to make an informed decision based on their personal preferences for categories. Moreover, this aspect is especially useful when users do not have time to read many reviews to infer the popularity of venues across these categories.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
January 2011 to February 2019

Permission-induced attacks, i.e., security breaches enabled by permission misuse, are among the most critical and frequent issues threatening the security of Android devices. By ignoring the temporal aspects of an attack during the analysis and enforcement, the state-of-the-art approaches aimed at protecting the users against such attacks are prone to have low-coverage in detection and high-disruption in prevention of permission-induced attacks. To address the aforementioned shortcomings, we present Terminator, a temporal permission analysis and enforcement framework for Android.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
July 2017

In addition to the dynamic nature of software while executing, this dynamism extends to the evolution of the software's code itself. The software's evolution is often captured in its entirety by revision-control systems (such as CVS, Subversion, and Git). By utilizing this rich artifact, as well as other historical artifacts (e.g., bug-tracking systems and mailing lists), we can offer a number of techniques for recommending future actions to developers.

Project Dates: 
August 2011

The rising popularity of mobile apps deployed on battery-constrained devices has motivated the need for effective energy-aware testing techniques. Energy testing is generally more labor intensive and expensive than functional testing, as tests need to be executed in the deployment environment, specialized equipment needs to be used to collect energy measurements, etc. Currently, there is a dearth of automatic mobile testing techniques that consider energy as a program property of interest.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
September 2015

Software designers frequently sketch when they design, particularly during the early phases of exploration of a design problem and its solution. In so doing, they shun formal design tools, opting for the whiteboard of pen/paper instead.  Calico is a sketch-based distributed software design tool that supports software designers with a variety of features that improve over the use of just pen-and-paper or a regular whiteboard, and are tailored specifically for early software design on tablets and electronic whiteboards.

Project Dates: 
January 2007

Multi-criteria test-suite minimization aims to remove redundant test cases from a test suite based on some criteria such as code coverage, while trying to optimally maintain the capability of the reduced suite based on other criteria such as fault-detection effectiveness. Existing techniques addressing this problem with integer linear programming claim to produce optimal solutions. However, the multi-criteria test-suite minimization problem is inherently nonlinear, due to the fact that test cases are often dependent on each other in terms of test-case criteria.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
July 2017

The broad goal of this project is to understand how to combine sustainability knowledge with information and communication technology (ICT) in creating sustainable communities. The Transition Movement is a global social experiment aiming to promote sustainable living and build ecological resilience in the near future at local levels. The Transition movement began in 2005 in Totnes, UK, a market town in South Devon. Today there are about 1000 registered Transition towns in 34 countries.

Project Dates: 
April 2013

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