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Research Projects

Anti-social behavior such as flaming and griefing is pervasive and problematic in many online venues. This behavior breaks established norms and unsettles the well-being and development of online communities. In a popular online game, Riot Games's League of Legends, the game company received tens of thousands of complaints about others every day. To regulate what they call "toxic" behavior, Riot devised the "Tribunal" system as a way of letting the community to police itself. The Tribunal is a crowdsoucing system that empowers players to identify and judge misbehavior.

Project Dates: 
April 2012

This research focuses on techniques for identifying and reducing the costs, streamlining the process, and improving the readiness of future workforce for the acquisition of complex software systems. Emphasis is directed at identifying, tracking, and analyzing software component costs and cost reduction opportunities within acquisition life cycle of open architecture (OA) systems, where such systems combine best-of-breed software components and software products lines (SPLs) that are subject to different intellectual property (IP) license requirements.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
October 2007

In the era of big data and personalization, websites and (mobile) applications collect an increasingly large amount of personal information about their users. The large majority of users decide to disclose some but not all information that is requested from them. They trade off the anticipated benefits with the privacy risks of disclosure, a decision process that has been dubbed privacy calculus. Such decisions are inherently difficult though, because they may have uncertain repercussions later on that are difficult to weigh against the (possibly immediate) gratification of disclosure. How can we help users to balance the benefits and risks of information disclosure in a user-friendly manner, so that they can make good privacy decisions?

Project Dates: 
September 2010

To enable much of our research to enable program understanding, software quality, and maintenance, we utilize and develop analyses of program code. These analyses model the flows of information through the logic of programs and systems. With these analysis models enable automated techniques to assist development and maintenance tasks.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
March 1998

The broad goal of this project is to understand how to combine sustainability knowledge with information and communication technology (ICT) in creating sustainable communities. The Transition Movement is a global social experiment aiming to promote sustainable living and build ecological resilience in the near future at local levels. The Transition movement began in 2005 in Totnes, UK, a market town in South Devon. Today there are about 1000 registered Transition towns in 34 countries.

Project Dates: 
April 2013

The rising popularity of mobile apps deployed on battery-constrained devices has motivated the need for effective energy-aware testing techniques. Energy testing is generally more labor intensive and expensive than functional testing, as tests need to be executed in the deployment environment, specialized equipment needs to be used to collect energy measurements, etc. Currently, there is a dearth of automatic mobile testing techniques that consider energy as a program property of interest.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
September 2015

Test suites often need to adapt to the software that it is intended to test. The core software changes and grows, and as such, its test suite also needs to change and grow. However, the test suites can often grow so large as to be unmaintainable. We have developed techniques to assist in the maintenance of these test suites, specifically in allowing for test-suite reduction (while preserving coverage adequacy) and test-suite prioritization.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
May 2001

When a live site is down or time is of the essence, software teams mobilize to fix bugs as fast as possible. How might such important bugs be fixed more quickly? One answer is through crowdsourcing, where ad-hoc participants are each given small, self-contained microtasks that are then aggregated into an overall solution. To explore this idea, we are currently designing new techniques and tools for crowd debugging.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
January 2013

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