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Research Projects

We developed a fault-localization technique that utilized correlation-based heuristics. The technique and tool was called Tarantula.  Tarantula uses the pass/fail statuses of test cases and the events that occurred during execution of each test case to offer the developer recommendations of what may be the faults that are causing test-case failures. The intuition of the approach is to find correlations between execution events and test-case outcomes --- those events that correlate most highly with failure are suggested as places to begin investigation.

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Project Dates: 
May 2001

This project describes and documents observational results that arise from the playtesting­-based evaluation of twenty-­six computer games focused on science learning or scientific research. We refer to this little studied genre of computer games as science learning games (SLGs). Our goal was to begin to identify a new set of criteria, play mechanics, and play experiences that give rise to play­-based learning experiences in the realm of different scientific topics.

Project Dates: 
October 2014

One of the most difficult tasks in debugging software for a developer is to understand the nature of the fault. Techniques have been proposed by researchers that can help *locate* the fault, but mostly neglected is a way to describe the nature of the fault. We are developing software models, visualizations, and techniques to aid in the diagnosis of the faults in the software.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
August 2011

To enable much of our research to enable program understanding, software quality, and maintenance, we utilize and develop analyses of program code. These analyses model the flows of information through the logic of programs and systems. With these analysis models enable automated techniques to assist development and maintenance tasks.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
March 1998

In the era of big data and personalization, websites and (mobile) applications collect an increasingly large amount of personal information about their users. The large majority of users decide to disclose some but not all information that is requested from them. They trade off the anticipated benefits with the privacy risks of disclosure, a decision process that has been dubbed privacy calculus. Such decisions are inherently difficult though, because they may have uncertain repercussions later on that are difficult to weigh against the (possibly immediate) gratification of disclosure. How can we help users to balance the benefits and risks of information disclosure in a user-friendly manner, so that they can make good privacy decisions?

Project Dates: 
September 2010

The Alloy specification language, and the corresponding Alloy Analyzer, have received much attention in the last two decades with applications in many areas of software engineering. Increasingly, formal analyses enabled by Alloy are desired for use in an on-line mode, where the specifications are automatically kept in sync with the running, possibly changing, software system. However, given Alloy Analyzer's reliance on computationally expensive SAT solvers, an important challenge is the time it takes for such analyses to execute at runtime.

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January 2016

Yelp reviews and ratings are important source of information to make informed decisions about a venue. We conjecture that further classification of yelp reviews into relevant categories can help users to make an informed decision based on their personal preferences for categories. Moreover, this aspect is especially useful when users do not have time to read many reviews to infer the popularity of venues across these categories.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
January 2011 to February 2019

Given the availability of large-scale source-code repositories, there have been a large number of applications for clone detection. Unfortunately, despite a decade of active research, there is a marked lack in clone detectors that scale to large software repositories. In particular for detecting near-miss clones where significant editing activities may take place in the cloned code.

Project Dates: 
January 2014

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