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Research Projects

We developed techniques for clustering of failures. Failure-clustering techniques attempt to categorize failing test cases according to the bugs that caused them. Test cases are clustered by utilizing their execution profiles (gathered from instrumented versions of the code) as a means to encode the behavior of those executions. Such techniques can offer suggestions for duplicate submissions of bug reports.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
July 2007

The broad goal of this project is to understand how to combine sustainability knowledge with information and communication technology (ICT) in creating sustainable communities. The Transition Movement is a global social experiment aiming to promote sustainable living and build ecological resilience in the near future at local levels. The Transition movement began in 2005 in Totnes, UK, a market town in South Devon. Today there are about 1000 registered Transition towns in 34 countries.

Project Dates: 
April 2013

This research addresses challenges in understanding and developing lightweight, Web-based informal music education environments that bring the complexity and joy of orchestral music to diverse audiences. The challenges span from providing awareness and appreciation of different classical music genres through creation of multi-instrument musical compositions, in ways that are fun and interactive.

Project Dates: 
January 2011

Microtask crowdsourcing systems such as FoldIt and ESP partition work into short, self-contained microtasks, reducing barriers to contribute, increasing parallelism, and reducing the time to complete work. Could this model be applied to software development? To explore this question, we are designing a development process and cloud-based IDE for crowd development.

Project Dates: 
May 2012

One of the most difficult tasks in debugging software for a developer is to understand the nature of the fault. Techniques have been proposed by researchers that can help *locate* the fault, but mostly neglected is a way to describe the nature of the fault. We are developing software models, visualizations, and techniques to aid in the diagnosis of the faults in the software.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
August 2011

One method of facilitating developers to understand the complex inner nature of software that we have employed is the use of information visualization. Software is often so complex that even the developers who initially created it cannot understand all of the possible runtime behaviors that it can exhibit --- specifically, all of the bugs that it may contain. In order to present large code bases with innumerable characteristics and relationships of its components (e.g., instructions, variables, values, and timings) we have developed a number of novel visualizations of software.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
May 2001

The dynamic nature of markets wherein business relationships are established and dissolved continuously demands systems that can cope with constant change, and do so with security paramount. These relationships are reified as services  that are offered by organizations and used  within a spectrum of domains and use contexts. Current service technologies fail to meet the requirements, however; interfaces are rigid, non-secure, and “one-size-fits-all solutions” which hardly meet the demands of any of its users.

Project Dates: 
July 2007

Test suites often need to adapt to the software that it is intended to test. The core software changes and grows, and as such, its test suite also needs to change and grow. However, the test suites can often grow so large as to be unmaintainable. We have developed techniques to assist in the maintenance of these test suites, specifically in allowing for test-suite reduction (while preserving coverage adequacy) and test-suite prioritization.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
May 2001

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