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Research Projects

Sourcerer is an ongoing research project at the University of California, Irvine aimed at exploring open source projects through the use of code analysis. The existence of an extremely large body of open source code presents a tremendous opportunity for software engineering research. Not only do we leverage this code for our own research, but we provide the open source Sourcerer Infrastructure and curated datasets for other researchers to use.

The Sourcerer Infrastructure is composed of a number of layers.

Project Dates: 
January 2006

In order to produce effective fault-localization, debugging, failure-clustering, and test-suite maintenance techniques, researchers would benefit from a deeper understanding of how faults (i.e., bugs) behave and interact with each other. Some faults, even if executed, may or may not propagate to the output, and even still may or may not influence the output in a way to cause failure. Furthermore, in the presence of multiple faults, faults may interact in a way to obscure each other or in a way to produce behavior not seen in their isolation.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
August 2011

This research focuses on techniques for identifying and reducing the costs, streamlining the process, and improving the readiness of future workforce for the acquisition of complex software systems. Emphasis is directed at identifying, tracking, and analyzing software component costs and cost reduction opportunities within acquisition life cycle of open architecture (OA) systems, where such systems combine best-of-breed software components and software products lines (SPLs) that are subject to different intellectual property (IP) license requirements.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
October 2007

In addition to the dynamic nature of software while executing, this dynamism extends to the evolution of the software's code itself. The software's evolution is often captured in its entirety by revision-control systems (such as CVS, Subversion, and Git). By utilizing this rich artifact, as well as other historical artifacts (e.g., bug-tracking systems and mailing lists), we can offer a number of techniques for recommending future actions to developers.

Project Dates: 
August 2011

Spacetime is a framework for developing time-stepped, multi-worker applications based on the tuplespace model. Workers compute within spacetimed frames -- a fixed portion of the shared data during a fixed period of time. The locally modified data may be pushed back to the shared store at the end of each step.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
January 2015

This project describes and documents observational results that arise from the playtesting­-based evaluation of twenty-­six computer games focused on science learning or scientific research. We refer to this little studied genre of computer games as science learning games (SLGs). Our goal was to begin to identify a new set of criteria, play mechanics, and play experiences that give rise to play­-based learning experiences in the realm of different scientific topics.

Project Dates: 
October 2014

Test suites often need to adapt to the software that it is intended to test. The core software changes and grows, and as such, its test suite also needs to change and grow. However, the test suites can often grow so large as to be unmaintainable. We have developed techniques to assist in the maintenance of these test suites, specifically in allowing for test-suite reduction (while preserving coverage adequacy) and test-suite prioritization.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
May 2001

The broad goal of this project is to understand how to combine sustainability knowledge with information and communication technology (ICT) in creating sustainable communities. The Transition Movement is a global social experiment aiming to promote sustainable living and build ecological resilience in the near future at local levels. The Transition movement began in 2005 in Totnes, UK, a market town in South Devon. Today there are about 1000 registered Transition towns in 34 countries.

Project Dates: 
April 2013

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