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Research Projects

The dynamic nature of markets wherein business relationships are established and dissolved continuously demands systems that can cope with constant change, and do so with security paramount. These relationships are reified as services  that are offered by organizations and used  within a spectrum of domains and use contexts. Current service technologies fail to meet the requirements, however; interfaces are rigid, non-secure, and “one-size-fits-all solutions” which hardly meet the demands of any of its users.

Project Dates: 
July 2007

Sticky

ISR has long been an internationally recognized leader in research into all aspects of open source software development. In this role, researchers at ISR along with colleagues throughout the U.S. helped to develop a new agenda that can help guide future research into open source software development.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
January 2000

Over the last several years we have been studying how digital media affects people’s lives. Rather than bring people into a laboratory, I view the real world as a living laboratory--I go where people live, study, and work, to study them as they go about their normal activities. Digital media use affects people’s mood, stress, and behavior quite significantly. In particular, people experience disruptions when working with digital media due to multi-tasking and interruptions.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
January 2004

Test suites often need to adapt to the software that it is intended to test. The core software changes and grows, and as such, its test suite also needs to change and grow. However, the test suites can often grow so large as to be unmaintainable. We have developed techniques to assist in the maintenance of these test suites, specifically in allowing for test-suite reduction (while preserving coverage adequacy) and test-suite prioritization.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
May 2001

Spacetime is a framework for developing time-stepped, multi-worker applications based on the tuplespace model. Workers compute within spacetimed frames -- a fixed portion of the shared data during a fixed period of time. The locally modified data may be pushed back to the shared store at the end of each step.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
January 2015

Given the availability of large-scale source-code repositories, there have been a large number of applications for clone detection. Unfortunately, despite a decade of active research, there is a marked lack in clone detectors that scale to large software repositories. In particular for detecting near-miss clones where significant editing activities may take place in the cloned code.

Project Dates: 
January 2014

Research shows that sharing one’s location can help people stay connected, coordinate daily activities, and provide a sense of comfort and safety [1]. Recently, smartphones and location-based services (LBS) have become widely available in developed countries [7], but only a small percentage of smartphone users have ever tried sharing lo­cation with other people [8]. Our work aims to understand real-world factors shaping behaviors and attitudes towards social location-sharing, especially in regards to why people avoid or abandon the technology, or limit their usage.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
May 2009

We developed a fault-localization technique that utilized correlation-based heuristics. The technique and tool was called Tarantula.  Tarantula uses the pass/fail statuses of test cases and the events that occurred during execution of each test case to offer the developer recommendations of what may be the faults that are causing test-case failures. The intuition of the approach is to find correlations between execution events and test-case outcomes --- those events that correlate most highly with failure are suggested as places to begin investigation.

Research Area(s): 
Project Dates: 
May 2001

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