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ISR Graduate Student Research Forum

The Graduate Student Research Forum mainly consists of two sessions with three paper presentations in each session. These sessions are preceeded by a breakfast session and followed by lunch. Each presentation will be 15 minutes long, with 5 minutes reserved for questions regarding the presentation for a total of 20 minutes. A detailed scheduled follows:

9:00 AM - 9:30 AM
Breakfast and networking.
9:30 AM - 10:30 AM
Session 1
Using Scenario Traceability to Support Scenario-Based Testing (abstract)
Leila Naslavsky, UCI; Debra Richardson, UCI; Hadar Ziv, UCI; Thomas Alspaugh, UCI

Parliament: A Software Module for Parliamentary Procedure (abstract)
Bayle Shanks, UCSD and Dana Dahlstrom, UCSD

Critical Code Studies (abstract)
Mark Marino, UCR
10:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Break
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Session 2
NA4CSCW: Characterizing Technology Adoption & Use (abstract)
Steve Abrams, UCI

Politics as Usual in the Blogosphere (abstract)
Norman Makoto Su, UCI, Yang Wang, UCI, and Gloria Mark, UCI

Automatic Generation of Rule-based Software Configuration Management Systems (abstract)
Guozheng Ge, UCSC and E. James Whitehead, Jr., UCSC
12:00 PM - 12:15 PM
Announcement: Cross-disciplinary project idea contest.
12:15 PM - 1:00 PM
Lunch (provided for attendees)
1:00 PM
Contest results

Paper Abstracts

Politics as Usual in the Blogosphere
Norman Makoto Su, Yang Wang, Gloria Mark, UCI

In recent years, the emergence of weblogs, commonly known as blogs, are changing the way that people interact over the Internet. Two particular kinds of blogs have become particularly popularó political and personal/hobby oriented blogs. Each of these types of blogs foster a community of readers and writers. In this paper, we investigate how the notion of community is expressed through these two blog genres. We examine the differences between community aspects in political and personal blogs. We focus on four dimensions that are associated with community: activism, reputation, social connectedness and identity. Our results, based on a multilingual worldwide blogging survey of 121 political and 593 personal/hobby bloggers from four continents show significant differences in community characteristics across these genres.

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Using Scenario Traceability to Support Scenario-Based Testing
Leila Naslavsky, UCI; Debra Richardson, UCI; Hadar Ziv, UCI; Thomas Alspaugh, UCI

Software testing remains the central activity used for ensuring that a system behaves as expected. It consists of three technical activities - test-case generation, execution, and evaluation. Some of these activities are still lacking proper automation. As consequence of this lack of automation, of time-to-market pressures, and of cost constraints, developers must release their products without proper testing. To alleviate this problem, we suggest moving testing concerns to earlier development phases, while providing better support for developers on using the actual end-users’ expectations to test their systems. These expectations are often expressed as scenarios, so, scenario-based testing should be used to show that the system satisfies them. One challenge for scenario-based testing is the need for mapping modeling to code concepts. Scenarios are artifacts used throughout the development life cycle, at different levels of abstraction and forms, and can be mapped from one level of abstraction to the other. Creating and maintaining the mapping across those scenarios can address this challenge and automate some scenario-based testing activities. This paper explains uses of scenarios in software phases, describes one way to relate scenarios across phases and the future research.

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Critical Code Studies
Mark Marino, UCR

In this paper, I will define Critical Code Studies, describe its use in the explication of code, and offer a brief demonstration using the script from Joseph Weizenbaum’s ELIZA.

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Parliament: A Software Module for Parliamentary Procedure
Bayle Shanks, UCSD and Dana Dahlstrom, UCSD

Parliamentary procedure is a widely used system of rules for group decision making. We describe a reusable software module, Parliament, that implements the logic and bookkeeping of parliamentary procedure, given a precise specification of the rules. Parliament is designed to be embedded in applications, such as to support face-to-face meetings or to facilite computer-mediated online deliberation. As a demonstration and testbed, we have created a partial working specification of Robert’s Rules of Order and an application equipped with a graphical user interface for use during face-to-face meetings. This paper describes the motivations for our approach and the components we have built.

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NA4CSCW: Characterizing Technology Adoption & Use
Steve Abrams, UCI

Social network analysis is a field with a long history and a recent increased visibility in CSCW research. The notion of social networks has long been used, in the CSCW literature, as a generic, metaphorical referent for a collection of social actors. Recently, some authors have tried to apply basic social network analytic methods to their research. This paper goes beyond the basics to apply substantive, appropriate methods to understand the adoption and use of a technology system deployed to support a distributed, collaborative design team.

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Automatic Generation of Rule-based Software Configuration Management Systems
Guozheng Ge, UCSC and E. James Whitehead, Jr., UCSC

Software Configuration Management (SCM) system is one of the most fertile areas in software engineering. However, lack of uniform semantic and repository modeling frameworks result in complexity for component and pattern reusability, feature compatibility, system customization, data migration and evolution. We propose model-driven frameworks and toolset for automated SCM system repository and feature creation using code generation and rule engine technologies. Taking the model specifications as input, our code generator produces a running SCM system with customized feature and repository layers.

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